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Beagle Ear Infection

What is a Beagle Ear Infection?

Ear infection is a common disease to Beagles and almost all dog breeds. This is a painful condition and Beagle Ear Infection requires urgent attention.

The long and floppy ears of your Beagle are some of his most adorable looks. However, these floppy ears increase his ability to catch an ear infection, which isn’t so adorable. With such an infection, you won’t see him jump up and down or become activated by the sight of you. Rather, he will be curled in a corner, agonizing in pain. It is important that he gets treatment as soon as possible lest the condition worsens.

Beagle with ear infection

How can I see if my Beagle has Ear Infection?

There are various ways in which you can determine whether your Beagle has an ear infection or not. One of the ways is to observe his behavior. If the disease is present, you will see him repeatedly scratching his ears. He also tends to shake his head almost every second. There times when the disease can be so advanced that every shake of the head is associated with a large blood clot being emitted.

Take a hold of your Beagle’s head and smell the ears from the inside. You are likely to sense some pretty bad smell. Try flapping the ears, up and down. If you sense some powerful odor, that’s an indication that all is not well.

Also, take a look at the discharge from the beagle’s ears. Various types of discharge are an indication that the beagle has an ear infection. It could be of any color, including black, green and yellow, and tends to be very thick.

In summary, these symptoms should guide you in determining whether your Beagle has or doesn’t have an n ear infection:

  • Head shaking
  • Odor from the ears
  • Tilted head in severe cases
  • Scratching and pawing the ear
  • Swelling
  • Hearing loss

 

Beagle pup with ear infection

Shall I see a vet if my Beagle has Ear Infection?

When you sense that your beagle has an ear infection based on the symptoms discussed above, you should see a vet. Diagnosis will be done by the veterinarian both on the eardrum and ear canal using magnifying lenses. The vet may also take a sample of ear discharge and examine for any yeast, bacteria or parasites.

In cases where a bacterial infection is suspected, the sample will be sent to a laboratory so as to know the type of infection being handled.

Given that the factors contributing to ear infection are many, it’s important to take your beagle to a vet if you suspect an ear infection. This is not a disease you can treat from home.

What can I feed my Beagle that has Ear Infection?

With the right food and help from a vet, you can combat an Beagle ear infection. Work hand in hand with your vet to eliminate foods that can potentially alleviate the ear infection. Some appropriate food options when your beagle has an ear infection include:

 

Beagle with ear infection

 

Conclusion: Your beagle with an infectious ear definitely is in pain. Take action fast before the condition deteriorates.

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Poodle Lyme Disease

What is Poodle Lyme Disease?

Poodle Lyme disease disease is a tick-transmitted disease whose symptoms are not easy to come by. The disease is typically painful, especially when joints swell.

Lyme Disease is normally caused by a bacterium, spirochete, which belongs to the Borrelia Burgdorferi species. Once your Poodle gets attacked by the infection, lameness as a result of joints inflammation is the most visible clinical feature. The disease could get serious and damage kidneys. In rare cases, the heart could also be impacted by Poodle Lyme Disease. Generally speaking, young Poodles appear to have a higher possibility of getting Lyme disease compared to the older ones.

Poodle Lyme Disease Illness Food Dog Dogs Nutrition sick

How can I see if my Poodle dog has Lyme disease?

It’s possible to determine whether your poodle dog has Lyme disease, but you need to pay a very keen attention for this. Remember that the symptoms for this disease do not manifest themselves so easily. In fact, it’s estimated that only 5% to 10% of the world’s dogs with the disease show symptoms.

Recurrent lameness is a popular symptom visible in your dog that has Poodle Lyme disease. There are times when the lameness could last for about 3 to 4 days, only for it to recur a few weeks later. The recurrence may be in the same leg or in any other leg. Shifting-leg lameness refers to a situation where other legs, rather than the initial one, are impacted by lameness. It leads to the swelling of joints, which can also be warm and painful.

By keenly observing your poodle dog that has Lyme disease, you should be able to see other symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Stiff walk
  • Lack of appetite
  • Fever
  • Depression (normally shown by the dog being withdrawn)
  • Nervous system complications and heart abnormalities may also occur

As Lyme disease advances, kidney failure may set in, triggering other signs like vomiting, weight loss, abnormal fluid buildups, thirst, and increased urination.

Shall I see a vet if my Poodle dog has Lyme disease?

Yes, you need to see a vet if your dog has Lyme disease. The vet will do basics like determining how advanced the disease could be. However, most of the treating will be done by you. When you discover a tick on your poodle dog, pluck it out immediately and preserve the tick in a jar. This can be used as a homeopathic remedy. You may use Ledum palustre 200C to prevent from effects of a recent tick bite. When it’s diagnosed that your poodle dog has Lyme disease, Aurum arsenicum 200C could be used as a treatment option. The dose normally lasts for a week and is administered twice a day.

Poodle Lyme Disease Illness Food Dog Dogs Nutrition sick

 

What can I feed my Poodle dog that has Lyme disease?

The kind of food given to your poodle dog with Lyme disease should be one rich in omega-3 fatty acids. The omega-3 fatty acids are useful in controlling an inflammation. Potential foods for your poodle dog include:

  • Hemp oil
  • Whole fish
  • Coconut oil
  • Fish oil
  • Flaxseed oil
  • Plant oils

Some foods for your dog witch are ritch on omega-3 fatty acids:

 

Conclusion: Some people fear that they can get Lyme disease from their dogs. That’s not true. The disease is not zoonotic. This gives you a chance to care for your poodle dog without any such worries.

 

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Bulldog Chocolate Poisoning

What is Bulldog Chocolate Poisoning?

Dogs, and even cats, are not allowed to eat chocolate. It is toxic! However, if your bulldog just ate one, do not panic, you can handle Bulldog chocolate poisoning. This article will guide you through.

Dogs, similar to humans, may develop the taste for foods that can harm their bodily systems. Consumption of these foods leads to food poisoning. Chocolate poisoning refers to an accidental or intentional instant when your bulldog eats chocolate. A chemical referred to as Theobromine is present in chocolate and can trigger seizures, high blood pressure or elevated heart rates. When your bulldog eats chocolate, you have to treat him immediately because the more chocolate he eats, the more there is in the body system, the higher the number of complications likely to happen.

French Bulldog Lazy dogsandkittens.com chocolate poisoning

 

How can I see if my Bulldog has Chocolate Poisoning?

It’s possible to tell if your dog is suffering from chocolate poisoning. The signs depicted are determined by the type and amount of chocolate eaten. The common clinical signs that your bulldog is likely to depict include restlessness or panting, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive urination, increased thirst, and a racing heart.

In extreme cases, heart failure, seizures and muscle tremors can be seen. The case may even be traumatic, including sudden death, when older bulldogs eat high quality dark chocolate.

The prognosis of chocolate poisoning can be worsened by complications such as the emergence of aspiration pneumonia due to vomiting.

It is important to understand that clinical signs for chocolate poisoning may take hours to show and go on for a couple of days. This is because Theobromine has a long half-life. Re-absorption of the chemical can eve take place through the bladder, hence you will need frequent walks that lead to increased urination.

Shall I see a vet if my Bulldog has Chocolate Poisoning?

You do not necessarily have to physically go to the veterinarian. A phone could be all that you need. When you discover that your bulldog has accidentally eaten chocolate, get to action right away. Begin by determining the amount of chocolate ingested and the type as well. This is the information that you’ll provide to your vet so that you can be directed further. Your vet will give you some home emergency care tips that can mean a difference between life and death for your bulldog.

The vet being far from you, make sure that you induce vomiting. After your bulldog eats chocolate, he may involuntarily start to throw up. However, if he doesn’t, you will have to try and make that happen. A teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide can help with Bulldog chocolate poisoning.

What can I feed my Bulldog that has Chocolate Poisoning?

Staying hydrated is a key requirement for your bulldog after chocolate poisoning. Make him drink more water for this will help him urinate more, getting rid of Theobromine. Give him some of the following foods:

  • Mix some charcoal with canned food (this encourages vomiting)
  • Chicken
  • Rice
  • Oatmeal
  • Honey
  • Egg whites
  • Bananas
  • Toast
  • Saltines
  • Peanut butter
  • Plain potatoes
  • Cereal

After the poisoning is over you can feed him some of these foods to ensure his recovery:

 

 

Conclusion: Seeing your bulldog develop complications from eating chocolate can be stressful. Avoid this by checking whatever he eats. You should also train him not to accept foods from strangers.

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What should you really feed your Senior Cat?

What should you really feed your Senior Cat?

One thing that all of us fear as pet owners is when our animals start to get older we won’t know what to do for them, or feed them. I know with my dearly loved Dutchy reaching the age of 13 this year I have seen some changes in her that need addressing, the biggest difference for us is what Dutchy will eat. Working on the research on what is the best thing to feed Dutchy, I have come across some helpful tips I would like to share with all cat owners on feeding a senior cats.

Basic Do’s & Don’ts

Do make sure that you keep your senior cat’s diet well balanced and something they will want to eat. You need to make sure it has all required potassium and taurine content. This is important no matter what age the cat is.

Don’t serve food that is super high in minerals and avoid the high protein kitten foods unless directed by your vet.

Do consider adding more fiber in your cat’s diet. Seniors are more likely to get constipation and if your vet can find no other medical reason for it fiber could be the cause.

Do think about warming wet food. If your cat is eating a wet food diet do think about warming it up a bit, many older felines prefer warmer food, especially if it has come right out of the fridge.

Don’t feed table scraps. Giving your senior cat (or any cat) table scraps is not advisable and it may put them off the regular food that they eat.

Do make sure you switch food over carefully and slowly in a mix if you change foods fully.

The first thing that many cat owners do when their cat hits that special age of being a senior which is 7 by most standards on food is run out and buy a bag of senior cat food. The truth is that many cats do not actually need that kind of food. There are very few differences in most kibble adult foods and kibble senior cat foods. When it comes down to it most brands have just used an age label as a way to market food to you and make you think that you need a special food. The truth is as long as you are feeding a high quality food that cuts out most of the fillers your cat is going to be doing fine.

What to keep an eye on with your food label

Meat is the first ingredient.

Depending on what you pick for your protein source you always want to see real meat as the first ingredient meaning that is what there is most of.

Do not be afraid of meat meal.

Chicken meal, turkey meal, salmon meal anything such as that is not a bad thing. It is simply that protein with the water already removed. So it is a great source of protein.

Avoid fillers.

So what is a filler? Well a food loaded with a lot of grains, or by-products will have a lot of fillers. Cats are obligate carnivores so they really do not need a lot of vegetable based anything.

Stay away from dyes.

While the pretty red, green and yellow food kibbles might look nice they are not actually healthy for your cat of any age. Stay with a natural colored food.

The bottom line is to know your cat. If you see that they are not eating, or dropping weight it is time to reevaluate your food. Dutchy gave us signs her mouth had become more sensitive and she needed more water content. Doing my due diligence we settled on some high quality wet food several times a day, it did the trick for Dutchy and that is what matters. So that really is the key, if your senior cat is doing fine on the quality food you have been feeding them do not switch it unless you need to.

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Are added vitamins in dog food worth the Price

Are added vitamins in dog food worth the Price

Vitamins in Dog Food

Added vitamins in dog food worth price as a result of vitamins are bio-molecules that are needed for cells to maintain their structure, grow and reproduce. Adding vitamins to the diet of your dog will provide him extra energy, improve his condition and assist him in recovery from specific ailments. Factors like breed, age and activity level can affect your dog’s vitamin needs. Puppies and older dogs are additional seemingly to want vitamins than healthy dogs in their prime. commercial dog food carrying the Association of American Feed management officials (AAFCO) label are balanced, however your individual dog should need vitamin supplements, that are best administered in the pet’s food.

Most dogs receive a complete and diet – including necessary vitamins and minerals – from commercially processed dog food, according to the FDA. Dogs fed a homemade diet might have supplements. “It’s completely crucial, but it should be done to match the diet,” Wynn says. “You can’t simply produce a meal and provides your dog a vitamin.” check with a physician or nutritionist for facilitate in determining what, if something, is needed.


Here’s what vitamins A, D, E and K each do

  • Vitamin A is good for eyesight, amongst other things
  • Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium to build bones
  • Vitamin E helps the body make red blood cells.
  • Vitamin K helps blood to clot and form protective scabs. 

How to: Adding Vitamins to Dog Food

 

Instructions:

  • Offer the vitamins in syrup, tablet or pill form to your dog, as you’d a treat. several dogs can accept their daily vitamin dose while not hesitation, by swallowing the tablet or licking the syrup off a plastic spoon.
  • Disguise the daily vitamin ration in a favorite treat, if the dog won’t accept it in its original form. This is often still a fast and simple method, and you’ll know that the full dose has been taken.
  • Disguise the vitamins in your dog’s favorite meal, if all else fails. Vitamins, in all of their forms, are simple enough to hide in your dog’s typical meal. Tablets could need to be crushed to stop the dog from detection them and ejection them out.
  • Add the complicated vitamin B complex to your dog’s diet, as these substances are answerable for variety of vital functions. B-3 is required to convert the food your dog eats, into energy, while B-1 or thiamine prevents nerve and heart disease.
  • Add the water soluble vitamin B complex vitamins and ascorbic acid to the food of your dog on a daily basis. These vitamins can’t be keeps by the body and should thus lean on a daily basis. It’s not easy to overdose on these vitamin, as a result of they are merely eliminated via the urine.
  • Include fat soluble vitamins, like vitamin A, D, E and K, in your dog’s diet also, but keep in mind that dogs cannot eliminate an excess of these vitamins, as they’ll in the case of water soluble vitamins.

 

Reference Links:

http://uk.pedigree.com/health-and-training/feeding-your-dog/which-vitamins-does-your-dog-need

http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=vitamins

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/11/04/nutrition-provided-by-your-pet-cat-food-or-pet-dog-food.aspx

http://www.dinovite.com/