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Bulldog Chocolate Poisoning

What is Bulldog Chocolate Poisoning?

Dogs, and even cats, are not allowed to eat chocolate. It is toxic! However, if your bulldog just ate one, do not panic, you can handle Bulldog chocolate poisoning. This article will guide you through.

Dogs, similar to humans, may develop the taste for foods that can harm their bodily systems. Consumption of these foods leads to food poisoning. Chocolate poisoning refers to an accidental or intentional instant when your bulldog eats chocolate. A chemical referred to as Theobromine is present in chocolate and can trigger seizures, high blood pressure or elevated heart rates. When your bulldog eats chocolate, you have to treat him immediately because the more chocolate he eats, the more there is in the body system, the higher the number of complications likely to happen.

French Bulldog Lazy dogsandkittens.com chocolate poisoning

 

How can I see if my Bulldog has Chocolate Poisoning?

It’s possible to tell if your dog is suffering from chocolate poisoning. The signs depicted are determined by the type and amount of chocolate eaten. The common clinical signs that your bulldog is likely to depict include restlessness or panting, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive urination, increased thirst, and a racing heart.

In extreme cases, heart failure, seizures and muscle tremors can be seen. The case may even be traumatic, including sudden death, when older bulldogs eat high quality dark chocolate.

The prognosis of chocolate poisoning can be worsened by complications such as the emergence of aspiration pneumonia due to vomiting.

It is important to understand that clinical signs for chocolate poisoning may take hours to show and go on for a couple of days. This is because Theobromine has a long half-life. Re-absorption of the chemical can eve take place through the bladder, hence you will need frequent walks that lead to increased urination.

Shall I see a vet if my Bulldog has Chocolate Poisoning?

You do not necessarily have to physically go to the veterinarian. A phone could be all that you need. When you discover that your bulldog has accidentally eaten chocolate, get to action right away. Begin by determining the amount of chocolate ingested and the type as well. This is the information that you’ll provide to your vet so that you can be directed further. Your vet will give you some home emergency care tips that can mean a difference between life and death for your bulldog.

The vet being far from you, make sure that you induce vomiting. After your bulldog eats chocolate, he may involuntarily start to throw up. However, if he doesn’t, you will have to try and make that happen. A teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide can help with Bulldog chocolate poisoning.

What can I feed my Bulldog that has Chocolate Poisoning?

Staying hydrated is a key requirement for your bulldog after chocolate poisoning. Make him drink more water for this will help him urinate more, getting rid of Theobromine. Give him some of the following foods:

  • Mix some charcoal with canned food (this encourages vomiting)
  • Chicken
  • Rice
  • Oatmeal
  • Honey
  • Egg whites
  • Bananas
  • Toast
  • Saltines
  • Peanut butter
  • Plain potatoes
  • Cereal

After the poisoning is over you can feed him some of these foods to ensure his recovery:

 

 

Conclusion: Seeing your bulldog develop complications from eating chocolate can be stressful. Avoid this by checking whatever he eats. You should also train him not to accept foods from strangers.

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Are added vitamins in dog food worth the Price

Are added vitamins in dog food worth the Price

Vitamins in Dog Food

Added vitamins in dog food worth price as a result of vitamins are bio-molecules that are needed for cells to maintain their structure, grow and reproduce. Adding vitamins to the diet of your dog will provide him extra energy, improve his condition and assist him in recovery from specific ailments. Factors like breed, age and activity level can affect your dog’s vitamin needs. Puppies and older dogs are additional seemingly to want vitamins than healthy dogs in their prime. commercial dog food carrying the Association of American Feed management officials (AAFCO) label are balanced, however your individual dog should need vitamin supplements, that are best administered in the pet’s food.

Most dogs receive a complete and diet – including necessary vitamins and minerals – from commercially processed dog food, according to the FDA. Dogs fed a homemade diet might have supplements. “It’s completely crucial, but it should be done to match the diet,” Wynn says. “You can’t simply produce a meal and provides your dog a vitamin.” check with a physician or nutritionist for facilitate in determining what, if something, is needed.


Here’s what vitamins A, D, E and K each do

  • Vitamin A is good for eyesight, amongst other things
  • Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium to build bones
  • Vitamin E helps the body make red blood cells.
  • Vitamin K helps blood to clot and form protective scabs. 

How to: Adding Vitamins to Dog Food

 

Instructions:

  • Offer the vitamins in syrup, tablet or pill form to your dog, as you’d a treat. several dogs can accept their daily vitamin dose while not hesitation, by swallowing the tablet or licking the syrup off a plastic spoon.
  • Disguise the daily vitamin ration in a favorite treat, if the dog won’t accept it in its original form. This is often still a fast and simple method, and you’ll know that the full dose has been taken.
  • Disguise the vitamins in your dog’s favorite meal, if all else fails. Vitamins, in all of their forms, are simple enough to hide in your dog’s typical meal. Tablets could need to be crushed to stop the dog from detection them and ejection them out.
  • Add the complicated vitamin B complex to your dog’s diet, as these substances are answerable for variety of vital functions. B-3 is required to convert the food your dog eats, into energy, while B-1 or thiamine prevents nerve and heart disease.
  • Add the water soluble vitamin B complex vitamins and ascorbic acid to the food of your dog on a daily basis. These vitamins can’t be keeps by the body and should thus lean on a daily basis. It’s not easy to overdose on these vitamin, as a result of they are merely eliminated via the urine.
  • Include fat soluble vitamins, like vitamin A, D, E and K, in your dog’s diet also, but keep in mind that dogs cannot eliminate an excess of these vitamins, as they’ll in the case of water soluble vitamins.

 

Reference Links:

http://uk.pedigree.com/health-and-training/feeding-your-dog/which-vitamins-does-your-dog-need

http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=vitamins

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2010/11/04/nutrition-provided-by-your-pet-cat-food-or-pet-dog-food.aspx

http://www.dinovite.com/

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Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

We are all aware of the dangers of diabetes in humans, but what about dogs? Although not as common in dogs as in humans, diabetes is still a major health concern among responsible dog parents. Diabetes is the most frequently reported endocrine disorder in dogs, affecting about 1 in 200 dogs. (1)

Dog parents must understand that diabetes in dogs is not a temporary issue. It is life threatening condition that requires lifelong commitment to insulin injections and feeding and dietary strategies.

Definition

Diabetes is a condition that occurs when a dog’s body is either unable to produce or unable to adequately utilize the hormone insulin. The purpose of insulin is to help regulate the dog’s blood sugar level, keeping it from skyrocketing too high or dropping too low. (2)

Diabetic dog food

The best approach for managing diabetes is by proper dietary strategy. Diabetic dog food should consist of a fixed formula with consistent:

  • high levels of high-quality proteins
  • high levels of dietary fiber
  • low levels of carbohydrates
  • low levels of fats.

Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog’s food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. (3)

Healthy dietary fiber is an integral part of all diabetic dog foods. Fiber is the indigestible portion of plant foods and there are 2 types of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Healthy dietary fiber have low caloric density and contribute in weight reduction. Healthy dietary fiber also promote satiety feeling, thus limiting the voluntary ingestion of food. Additionally, certain fiber, such as CMC (carboxymethylcellulose) slows down the emptying of the stomach, and by doing so, slows the delivery of sugar into the bloodstream.

Tip: Fiber takes water from the body and if your dog does not drink enough, it may lead to constipation. When using diabetic dog food, make sure your dog has a plenty of fresh water at its disposal.

When it comes to diabetic dog food is not the carbohydrate itself that matters, as much as its glycemic index. The glycemic index measures the effects of the food’s carbohydrates on blood sugar levels. If a food has low glycemic index it is digested slowly and steadily and it slows down the delivery of sugar into the bloodstream. Typical examples of carbohydrates with low glycemic indexes include ancestral cereals such as oats, spelt and barley. At the opposite side of the scale, rice which has high glycemic index, is digested quickly and results with blood sugar peak and sudden high demand for insulin.

Tip: Since any change in carbohydrates affects the amount of insulin needed, try to feed the same amount of the same type of food at the same time each day, ideally in two meals, 12 hours apart. (4)

Specially formulated diabetic dog foods induce an optimal and gradual post-prandial glycemic response that modulates the insulin release. Simply stated, they help keep the blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Keeping the blood sugar levels normal makes it less likely, your dog will get diabetes related complications such as vision clouding (cataract) and urinary tract infections. (5)

Note: Putting your diabetic dog’s blood sugar levels under control takes time. Do not get discouraged if the blood sugar levels are not optimal at your first checkup at the vet.

How to improve the taste of diabetic dog food?

Even the best diabetic dog food can be useless if your dog does not like how it tastes. Fortunately you can improve the diabetic food’s taste and make it more tempting by adding:

  • 1 tablespoon of low-carb canned food in the regular diabetic food
  • few small pieces of shredded chicken in the regular diabetic food
  • 3 tablespoons of low-sodium chicken broth in the regular diabetic food.

Tip: Never inject insulin on empty stomach, since it can make your dog sick.

What to avoid?

Soft, semi-moist and wet foods must be avoided, because they are very high in sugar and stimulate the greatest blood sugar increase after eating.

Can I give my diabetic dog treats?

As funny and mischievous it gets, on occasions your dog is a good boy/girl. And on those occasions he/she deserves a reward. Do not deprive your dog of treats. As long as the treat has low glycemic index and low caloric density it is safe for your diabetic fur baby.

Tip: Replace commercial dog treats with diabetic friendly whole food treats, such as carrots, chunks of melon, apples (without peel and seeds), broccoli and blueberries.

Seeking professional opinion

No matter how many insightful blogs you have read and how many well-educated salespersons at local pet stores you have talked to, always go a step further and seek professional opinion. Talk to your trusted vet or dog nutritionist. Every diabetic dog needs tailored approach and modified dietary strategy. A true professional will take into consideration your dog’s:

  • current state of health
  • body weight
  • level of physical activity.

Diabetes in dogs is chronic and serious, but effectively manageable health condition. The key to controlling and treating diabetes is by regulating the blood sugar levels. Luckily canine nutrition has come a long way in recent years and a properly controlled diet can keep the blood sugar levels within acceptable limits.

All in all, although scary, having your dog diagnosed with diabetes, is not the end of the world. With proper care and devotion, your dog can live a long and healthy life.

Products

Here you can see the latest products of our Diabetic Dog Food Category. Use the flavor sprays to tasten up the food for your best friend!

Find all products here.

Key words: diabetic dog food, blood sugar levels, low glycemic index, healthy dietary fiber

References:

1. Fogle B. (2005) Caring for your dog, The complete canine home reference, D&K

2. Barrington K. (2016) Diabetic Dog Food, online article at: https://pawster.com/diabetic-dog-food/

3. https://www.1800petmeds.com/education/diets-diabetic-pets-11.htm

4. Straus M. & Puotinen C. J. (2017) Managing diabetes in dogs, online article at: https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/15_5/features/Canine-Diabetes-Diagnosis-and-Treatment_20521-1.html

5. https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/diabetes-dog-diet#1

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Senior dog food is scam! (Customer Opinion)

Disclaimer

Attention!!! THIS IS NOT WRITTEN BY DOGSANDKITTENS.COM nor does it mean that we share or dispute this option. But we thought this might interest you.

This was a mail we got from a customer of our site and asked for permission to release it here. Although she didn’t want her name attached to it. We want to say thank you for your letter!

Senior dog food is scam!

The simple truth is animal digest and by-products are as nutrient-rich as their whole-meat counterparts, however super-premium provender makers prey on people’s human sensibilities when marketing food. They win over the client that “gross” equals “unhealthy,” when in reality farm and ranch dogs for virtually thousands of years have subsisted on nothing but the necks, backs, viscera, and entrails of discarded bovine/swine/equine. It’s one factor when you will throw discarded horse organs in a bucket and have your hound eat it out of sight and out of mind. It’s another factor entirely when you are attempting to plug that bucket on a fairly new bag of kibble at your native Petsmart. Higher that the ingredients list “mechanically de-boned chicken meal” or “organic free-range bovid,”  right?

If you dig even deeper into the method, by-product meal is additionally the lot of environmentally sound alternative compared to whole meat-based kibble. Consider the numbers of animals slaughtered in the food in 2008: about three million sheep, thirty five million cows, 117 million pigs, 264 million turkeys, and nine billion chickens. Humans don’t eat a lot of of the organs and bones–the offal–of these animals even though several of those by-products are even as nutritious because the components we do eat. (Again, the “gross” issue inhibits our decision-making.) But by-products account for forty ninth of the weight of cows, a quarter mile of pigs, and thirty seventh of chickens. Animal by-products add up to fifty four billion pounds a year in the alone. Tiny amounts of animal waste are often composted, but quantities like this overwhelm any disposal system. None of the apparent disposal options–incineration, burial, and merchandising in landfills–is capable the task. All are environmentally venturous, and every one are wasteful of helpful nutrients.

I’m not about to tell you what you should or shouldn’t feed your dog. If his energy is sweet, and if he has good coat and stool quality, KEEP FEEDING HIM WHAT you are FEEDING HIM. In the meantime, is it an excessive amount of to raise to have a honest dialogue concerning pet food? If you have never fed your dog a particular product, if you have never personally witnessed his quality of life on a particular food, then NO, you’re NOT qualified to evaluate the standard of that food just by repetition and pasting the ingredients label and telling people to see out dogfoodanalysis.com. (On that same note, will we dispense with the intellectually lazy “I bet some individuals will live their whole lives on McDonalds” one-liners?)

And if anyone’s curious, I feed my current husky/border Purina ONE Adult Chicken and Rice, that I amend with one will of sardines on Mondays and one prod Thursdays. (I’ve noticed once fostering a few husky/malamute mixes that sardines build the wolf/spitz breeds’ coats much glow in the dark.) i attempted transitioning volute to canidae All Life Stages from pro set up Chicken & Rice in the initial couple weeks once I adopted him from the shelter, however his wet, bloody stools afraid Pine Tree State back to Purina ONE. (Why did not I simply place volute back on pro Plan? that is a story for another thread, however let’s simply say the new “Shredded Blend” sucks. For whatever reason, Purina likes to tinker with the formulas in its pro plan line, and it shows in animals’ skin and stool quality.)

 

Attention!!! THIS IS NOT WRITTEN BY DOGSANDKITTENS.COM nor does it mean that we share or dispute this option. But we thought this might interest you.